Falconry

Using trained birds of prey ISM can help manage your bird problems, the presence of a bird of prey can be an effective deterrent. The bird of prey does not kill or injure the pest birds but enforces a change of behaviour. The pest birds will consider the area unsafe and will therefore move to an area that has no predatory threat.

Falconry can be used in many situations, in urban towns such as Camberley, Farnham, Farnborough, Woking and Aldershot and the countryside areas of the Surrey Hills around Guildford and West Sussex in the south east region.

Nearly all birds consider the presence of a bird of prey a threat, our programs can be used against Pigeons, Gulls, Corvids and Geese. They can also be used in the construction industry to prevent ground nesting birds causing expensive delays if used prior to the nesting season.

Bird deterrents on the market such as distress callers, kites and such like have a very limited use. The pest birds soon become accustomed to them and their efficiency can be as little as a week or two, therefore offering very poor value for money.

Our expert free survey can ensure you receive an effective solution providing value for money.

For a free survey call 01276 537510

The Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981 - Read more
Birds and their nests are protected by law; expert advice must be sought if birds are impacting your business or home.

The Wildlife & Countryside Act 1981

All birds, their nests and eggs are protected by law and it is thus an offence, with certain exceptions (see Exceptions), to:

  • intentionally kill, injure or take any wild bird
  • intentionally take, damage or destroy the nest of any wild bird whilst it is in use or being built
  • intentionally take or destroy the egg of any wild bird
  • have in one’s possession or control any wild bird, dead or alive, or any part of a wild bird, which has been taken in contravention of the Act or the Protection of Birds Act 1954
  • have in one’s possession or control any egg or part of an egg which has been taken in contravention of the Act or the Protection of Birds Act 1954
  • use traps or similar items to kill, injure or take wild birds
  • have in one’s possession or control any bird of a species occurring on Schedule 4 of the Act unless registered, and in most cases ringed, in accordance with the Secretary of State’s regulations (see Schedules)
  • intentionally or recklessly disturb any wild bird listed on Schedule 1 while it is nest building, or at a nest containing eggs or young, or disturb the dependent young of such a bird.

Fines

The maximum penalty that can be imposed for an offence under the Wildlife and Countryside Act – in respect of a single bird, nest or egg – is a fine of up to £5,000, and/or six months’ imprisonment.